Blogging from A to Z Challenge: K is for Karst

Blogging from A to Z April 2017 Challenge

For the first time, I’m participating in the Blogging from A to Z April Challenge! The concept is simple: Each day in April I’ll be blogging on a topic  starting with the letter of the day, beginning with A and progressing to Z by the end of the month. Posts will be short and will relate to my chosen theme: my new coming of age story, Rightfully Ours, released April 1.


K bloggingK is for Karst

We’re almost halfway through the alphabet, and I’m feeling a little loopy. What is “karst” anyway? And why did I choose it over “kiss”?

In Rightfully Ours, between the fracking, a rainy spring, and some other geological factors, conditions are ripe for a phenomenon I’ve seen plenty of in south-central Pennsylvania – the sinkhole. No, karst isn’t precisely what I imagine going on underneath my fictional world, but it’s pretty close, what with limestone deposits being prevalent in these parts.

Karst, terrain usually characterized by barren, rocky ground, caves, sinkholes, underground rivers, and the absence of surface streams and lakes. It results from the excavating effects of underground water on massive soluble limestone. The term originally applied to the Karst (or Kras) physiographic region, a limestone area northeast of the Gulf of Trieste in Slovenia, but has been extended to mean all areas with similar features. (Encylcopeadeia Brittanica)

I’d never heard of karst until I started doing a little book research. Interestingly, this is probably what it looks like deep below our basement! Our house is situated about an eighth of a mile from a natural attraction along the Swatara Creek, Indian Echo Caverns. Our neighbors two doors down said that from their basement, they used to be able to hear the sounds of rushing water.

I’ve always been fascinated by caves, and as kid, on our limited travels, I would beg my parents to stop at them. I’d guess I’ve visited five or six caves over the years, most in Pennsylvania. I’m hoping to visit Mammoth Cave National Park next year with my family!

Have you visited natural caverns? 


A is for Algebra.

B is for Baking.

C is for Chastity.

D is for Doodling.

E is for Ectopic Pregnancy.

F is for Fracking.

G is for Gold.

H is for Hot Chocolate.

I is for iPodPlaylist.

J is for Jekyll and Hyde.


THANKS FOR STOPPING BY! STAY A WHILE AND LOOK AROUND. LEAVE A COMMENT. SHARE WITH A FRIEND. IF YOU LIKE WHAT YOU SEE, PLEASE SIGN UP FROM MY AUTHOR NEWSLETTER TO KEEP UP-TO-DATE ON NEW RELEASES, EXTRAS, AND HOT DEALS!

20 thoughts on “Blogging from A to Z Challenge: K is for Karst

  1. Visited many caves and caverns – but never been spelunking. There are some wonderful cave systems in Wales that we always visit when back there.

    • I haven’t tried spelunking either. There was a time when I very much wanted to, but, now, not so much. I’m good in walking through a cave or floating through in a boat.

  2. I love caves as well! My family holidays as a teenager were spent spelunking in some pretty rugged caves south of Sydney. We’d be abseiling through some parts, then wriggling through tiny gaps on our bellies the next minute. We’d all come out covered in mud and pretty work out, ready for a nice dinner around the campfire. Thanks for a great post! Brought back loads of happy memories!

  3. Many years ago I did similar research. South Dakota has several big caves, including Jewel Cave (which is near where I imagine my stories taking place) and also Wind Cave. I would love to visit Mammoth Cave someday too!

  4. Have visited Ajanta and Ellora caves in Aurangabad district of Maharashtra state, in India. Since 1983 they have been declared as world heritage sites by UNESCO. Also have visited Elephanta Caves, in Gharapuri, Mumbai India. It is also a world heritage site by UNESCO.
    As for the sinkholes and karsts, only have seen it on TV or web… no luck here!
    ————————————————
    Anagha From Team MocktailMommies
    Collage Of Life

  5. I love visiting caves! But not really the kind you need equipment for. I tend to prefer not getting dirty and taking advantage of the touristy caves instead. 🙂

    With Love,
    Mandy

  6. We have a lot of gold mines where I live, which I guess are sort of manmade caves. I think I visited a real cave once, but most of my experience underground is visiting mines.
    Fun post!

  7. I ‘ve been it a few caves in Tennessee and north Georgia. When I went on a cruise along the coast of Mexico we did an excursion to a nature area where you could float on an underground river. That was cool (literally). Girl Who Reads

Comments are closed.